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Aïkido Knowledge base

Tegatana and holds pattern

Start gripping Ken with the little finger, followed by the third and other fingers, over your head.
Tegatana ( Sword-edge of Hand) and hold patterns
 

Tegatana can be used in numerous ways. As the basic rules, it is important to strike always from above the head of your partner. When delivering a circular strike, some trainees are often seen using their Tegatana Horizontally instead of landing it from above the head, it is wrong. The descending pattern of a circular strike should be the same as that of a straight strike. The motion peculiar to a circular strike is caused by a twist of the hips. 

To form a habit of striking from above the head, it is suggested that priority be given to a straight strike in Suburi (Sword-swinging without partner) practice. This exercise should be conducted in parallel with “consecutive strikes” at the left and right, thereby maintaining a balance in hips twisting motions. Both exercises must be adaptable to empty-handed practice. Suburi N°5 (Deflective counter-strike) should also be practiced after the pattern of a straight strike. A straight strike is the most difficult Ken momentum to parry. 

In ken holding motions. Both exercises must be adaptable to empty –handed practice. Suburi N°5 (deflective counter –strike) should also be practiced after the pattern of a straight strike. A straight strike is the most difficult Ken momentum to parry. 

In Ken holding, grip it first with the little finger, followed by the third finger, middle finger and forefinger in that order. When striking down from above your head grip it mainly with your left hand using your right as an aid. Squeeze the palms of your hands as you swing down. Your ken is supposed to stop descending in front of the lower abdomen but a full descending momentum is called for in the exercise. Twist your hips effectively in making a strike, letting the part of your body do the “cutting”. 

Then Ken grip pattern is entirely applicable to empty-handed exercises. The knack of the holds in “Katate-dori” (One hand held), “Ryote-dori” (Both hands held) and “Shiho-nage” (Four corner throw) exercises is to be found in this pattern. If you build up sufficient abominable breath power along with ‘training in grip strength”, a so-called “grip” alone can be used as a technique to subdue your partner. 

In using Tegatana, keep the fingers apart, stretch the peripheral area out and semi circularly the shoulder-to-fingertip portion like the curve of a sword. If the fingers are stuck together, the flow of Ki will be blocked. Try it and see how it goes. Besides striking exercise, Tegatana is used quite often in a variety of empty-handed exercises. The ensuing photographs will help you study this particular subject.